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Auckland University of Technology (AUT) has been granted exemption from the Initial Teacher Education moratorium that’s currently in place, so it can offer teacher training in South Auckland from the start of 2018, Education Minister Nikki Kaye announced today.

“I announced in May that the moratorium on new teacher education programmes will be lifted in January 2018,” says Ms Kaye.

“Exempting AUT from the moratorium now will enable them to open enrolments for their Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood and Primary Teaching) qualification, so that students can attend the South Campus in Manukau from the start of next year.

“Currently, trainee teachers living in South Auckland who are enrolled in AUT programmes must travel to the North Shore campus, and that has an obvious impact in terms of travel time and costs.

“This is about making it easier for people living in South Auckland to pursue teaching careers.

“It’s important to me that we encourage diversity in our teaching profession, and we help local principals overcome challenges they face finding quality applicants to fill vacancies.

“Today I’ve announced a further $3 million of funding to help increase teacher numbers, with a focus on addressing supply pressures being experienced in Auckland.

“This funding will expand the popular Auckland Beginner Teacher Project, and  provide relocation grants for returning New Zealand trained teachers or overseas trained teachers.

“Making it easier for people to train as teachers in South Auckland means we should also increase the pool of teachers available to step into local jobs once they’ve completed their training.”

Notes

The current moratorium on new teacher education programmes has been in place since 2000. The aim of the moratorium was to gain control over the quantity and quality of initial teacher education programmes. Significant quality assurance has now been put in place, enabling the moratorium to be lifted next year and applications opened to good quality, innovative providers.

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